248-539-0262
info@ArtLeaders.com

248-539-0262
info@ArtLeaders.com

 

Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

 

Antonio Molinari: Victorious

Posted on: June 13th, 2022 by Art Leaders No Comments

The Inspiration Behind the Canvas

Victory II by Antonio Molinari

Antonio Molinari draws inspiration from the techniques of Paul Jenkins and Helen Frankenthaler. He creates an array of mesmerizing tones and shapes by focusing on

colors interlacing in such a way that there is an illusion of depth. For instance, he pours color like crossing veils suspended without gravity. While his paintings remain energetic, he gently executes each painting with refinement. The relationship between these transparent hues invites us into an intimate moment.

“My paintings focus on connections. Through harmonious movements of paint, I take people on a journey. It can be a brief moment of uplifting energy or an hour of deep inspiration, but my greatest reward is moving the viewer emotionally.”

Antonio Molinari was born and raised in Michigan. He credits his artistic inspiration to his childhood spent in the countryside. There, he fell in love with nature at a very young age. In particular, Molinari recalls a view across an open hillside, which lead to a beautiful tree line. He would wake up early just to watch the sunrise and wait “for the rays of light to dance across the treetops”. He says, “I love that memory so much that I am compelled to capture it. Pouring energy and wonder onto a canvas in hopes to share that same bliss of inspiration.”

“When painting I feel like I’m pouring emotions onto the canvas. I amalways chasing, and trying to capture a positive reflection of a moment. To me, the paint has to be fluid and graceful. The paint personifies emotional transitions that arise within all of us. This is what makes us human and sparks heart felt connections.

I fell in love with abstract painting because it is such a departure from my daily design work. The expression and emotion of the paintings aren’t defined by feasibility guidelines. I have a fond appreciation for when my abstracts aren’t followed up with questions like “how are we going to build this?” The freedom from rules is marvelous. Pursuing both techniques truly enhance each other. It’s how I achieve the highest sense of balance with all my artistry.”

Victory II by Antonio Molinari

Victory II

“I painted Victory II during a time I was facing many challenges and each morning felt like a test. During one of the more difficult days, I stepped outside and looked to the sky, I witnessed a new dawn where the warmth of sunlight cut through crisp morning air, and it filled me with optimism. Experiencing that moment gave me strength to push through and be victorious. This painting represents the optimism that I experienced. I hope it inspires others to overcome their daily challenges.”

Click to view Victory II on our website.

Antonio Molinari on Artsy

See the full viewing room and show for Antonio Molinari on Artsy! Fall in love with the story behind his works. Read more by clicking the link below.

Molinari on Artsy

Stay updated on all new works. Follow Antonio on Instagram!

You can view the entire Antonio Molinari Collection on his artist page here. Don’t miss Molinari’s solo show and book signing coming up on Saturday, June 25th, 2022. View never before seen works, meet the artist, and enjoy delicious wine and hors d’oeuvres. View more details about the event. 

Ukrainian Artists

Posted on: April 19th, 2022 by Art Leaders No Comments

Artist Spotlight – April

Ukrainian Artists – Konstantin Savchenko, Anastasiya Skryleva, Andrii Afansiev 

Art Leaders Gallery is proud to represent three talented Ukrainian artists. Among many well-known international and local artists, our Ukrainian artists are some of our top-selling and most gifted artists. Konstantin Savchenko, Anastasiya Skryleva, and Andrii Afanasiev are all oil painters, yet their individual styles emerge in their paintings. While each artists paints with thick texturized oil paint, their unique processes and varying subjects allow them to distinguish themselves. For our April Artist Spotlight, we are happy to showcase our Ukrainian Artists. Find their Artists Biographies below.

Konstantin Savchenko

Romance in the City by Konstantin Savchenko at Art Leaders GalleryTo begin, world renowned artist, Savchenko, creates paintings that are full of color and textures. Each oil painting is a study of blending paint with palette knife to create stunning landscapes, cityscapes, seascapes, and florals. Further, he expresses emotion and beauty by building up his shadows and highlights with heavy textures.

Savchenko began traveling the world with this family at a young age. During his travels, he studied painting techniques at various exhibitions.  Furthermore, he took part in many shows while studying at the Kharkov Art and Industry Institute. His work evolved into what it is today by pushing his methods and his colorful textures. Furthermore, he now works as an Art Instructor at the Kharkov Art College.  He teaches his unique style, and his students are inspired by his artwork. His paintings are both moving and intimate due to their color and emotional subjects, such as Venetian landscapes, couples in the park, and stunning floral arrangements.

View Savchenko’s work on our website or on his instagram page!

 


Anastasiya Skryleva

Anastasiya was born on February 18, 1997 in Kharkov. Her life has been centered around art since she learned how hold a paintbrush. This has shaped her into the young artist she is today. In 2012 she entered the Kharkov Art College where she began her artistic training under previously mentioned, world renowned artist Konstantin Savchenko. She exhibited her work with other students and faculty in both 2013 and 2014. Since 2013, she has taken part in exhibitions of the Ukrainian Union of Artists. She also opened at the collective exhibition “New Wave” in Gallery Smalto in 2014. Canada, China, France, Germany, Poland, Russia, Turkey and the Ukraine displayed her collections in both public and private settings.

Skryleva’s oil paintings capture deep tones and layered colors to create stirring images that speak to the viewer. Among landscapes of her native Ukraine, she favors depicting still life arrangements, and the beautiful fluidity of decorative koi fish. In the gallery, you will see many intricate floral arrangements resting on top of a female figures head. These floral portraits have become a recognized subject matter of Skryleva. Art Leaders Gallery is proud to be the first gallery in the United States to represent this young, blossoming artist.

View Skryleva’s work on our website or on his instagram page!

 


Andrii Afanasiev

Andrii Afanasiev has spent years studying fine arts in Ukraine. He began this passion in his youth. He received his education at the State Art College. At this time, Andrii became an apprentice in the painting department. After spending six years in school, Andrii transferred to The National Academy of Fine Arts. In addition, Andrii began his passion for art restoration. There, he received his degree in art restoration and painting. Now, he enjoys creating floral, seascape, and landscape paintings with bold texture and oil paint.

Andrii continues to build his career around painting and restoring famous fine artworks. He currently works as a master painter and fine art restorer at The Museum of Contemporary Art of Ukraine, as well as The Museum of Theater Music and Cinema of Ukraine. With this, he learns new methods of painting texture, color, and medium.

As a result of this knowledge, he creates stunning abstract florals, and textured seascapes. Moreover, he creates large scale paintings with layers of oil to draw out texture and depth. For example, when looking at one of his seascapes, one can almost hear the waves on the ocean. Andrii is popular for his romantic, contemporary, floral paintings. He effortlessly paints his floral pieces ‘floating’ on the canvas. Andrii paints each subject with textural strokes and beautiful blends of color.  Furthermore, his stunning paintings cross boundaries between classic and contemporary.

View Afanasiev’s work on our website!

Houston Llew’s Spiritiles

Posted on: August 27th, 2021 by Art Leaders No Comments

Houston Llew’s Spiritiles- Art for Everyone

 

Houston Llew’s Spiritiles are wonderful fine art pieces which capture emotions, memories, and moments in time. For instance, each piece tells the story of a special memory or loved one that we can cherish forever. Furthermore, spiritiles make great individual gifts for special occasions. They make wonderful collections, and create striking displays when grouped together as treasured fine art memories in your home.

Houston Llew’s Spiritiles Process

Enameling Process

These unique, handmade tiles are made of fine colored glass on a copper canvas that depict moments and tell stories. They are fired in a kiln to create a beautiful “crazing” effect that occurs in the enamel. Consequently, this creates small cracks in the glass and brings out the vibrance in the colors. Above all, Spiritiles work beautifully as stand-alone pieces, or can be displayed together on a wall for a striking display of art.

Spiritiles History

Houston Llew studied under a master enamellist, Zingaro, in Atlanta, Georgia, and continues to live and work there today. He pairs quotes and stories with dueling images to create new context in each one of his tiles. He wants his work to connect to real life emotions and uplift his viewers. Therefore, he creates unique experiences when viewing the works.

Each Spiritile tells a story, with a quote that runs along the outer edge of each piece. Llew wants each piece to harness an emotion and tell a story of a moment in time. As a result, Spiritiles make sentimental gifts to commemorate life’s special moments either for yourself or someone else.

Llew’s collection of Spiritiles evolve with time. Certain tiles become retired, and he actively creates new work. Subsequently, with his vast collection of moments, there is a Spiritile that is sure to resonate with you. In short, Spiritiles are a perfect way to bring a personalized fine art addition into your home, or the home of a loved one.

Spiritiles Availability

Art Leaders Gallery is proud to offer a large selection of Houston Llew’s Spiritiles, both new and retired. Therefore, let us help you find your next unique piece. Check out our current inventory today!

Learn More

Pop! – Goes the Art World

Posted on: June 26th, 2018 by admin No Comments

You can’t not know what Pop Art is. I mean –you can, but if you saw pop art you’d definitely recognize it. And that’s very much the intention of the movement –to be popular. Not to become popular, but to already exist as something popular. How can this be? Pop Art as a movement creates a mirror for popular culture –it’s things like Campbell soup cans, Wonder Woman, and large balloon animals. Pop artists have faced critiques of originality from the movement’s inception; however, one look at these artworks and you won’t be able to deny their creativity.

Pop art arose in the 1950s as a reactionary art movement to abstract expressionism. Abstract Expressionism concerned itself with the subconscious or the spiritual; it was spontaneous, automatic, and had great emotional intensity. The point was to avoid the artistic censorship that occurred after World War II (and all the political propaganda “art” that came with it) by creating art with abstract or neutral subject matter –think Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko.

Pop Artists entered the art scene in an attempt to lighten the mood from the intensity of this genre by reverting to the everyday realities of popular culture. They emphasized the banal, kitschy, even the cheap elements of society –employed in an almost satirical or ironic reaction to the art of the times. Things you’d normally see in comic books, advertisements, and every day mundane (albeit cultural) objects appeared in compositions whose creators called them “art”. And by the 1960’s, “Pop Art”, as it came to be known, was ready to change the world. Artists such as Roy Lichtenstein and Andy Warhol dominated the art scene. But it wasn’t just an art-movement, it was an ideology; it was a lifestyle

In the 1980s Pop art had a resurgence known as “Neo-Pop”. Like the Pop art of the 60’s it was confrontational and irreverent and witty. The Pop aesthetic never really went away and can be seen today in street graffiti, comic books, photo montage, and large-scale sculpture. The movement remains relevant today because people are drawn to the objectivity of these artworks. Pop culture motifs give viewers a feeling of inclusion or belonging –the artwork has an immediate personal significance.

Were they trying to make a socio-political statement? A critique of society? Or were they finding real beauty in Campbell’s Soup cans? Maybe they just saw everyday objects artistically?

Images by: https://www.themodern.org/blog/Contemporary-Pop-Art/343 & https://mymodernmet.com/what-is-contemporary-art-definition/

The Floral Still Life: Its Stems and Roots

Posted on: June 26th, 2018 by admin No Comments

In this month’s exhibition we’re celebrating flowers and their appearance in various artwork styles from traditional to contemporary. The roots of this subject matter, so to speak, lie within the still life.

The still life grew in popularity, especially in northern Europe, during the 17th century. The intention of the still life at this time was to teach a moral lesson, especially to remind the viewer of the transience of life. Each bloom was imbued with a personal, cultural, or even religious significance –wilting flowers reminded the viewer of the temporality of life, lilies indicated the Virgin Mary, pink roses signified a clandestine love, etc. Despite their beauty and significance, “floral still life” as a subject matter remained at the bottom of the painting hierarchy, trailing far behind grandiose history paintings.

“ . . . Even if the painter of flowers need not make the same studies to make or conquer the same difficulties as the history painter, does that mean flower painting is a lower or more limited genre?”—a review of the 1817 Salon

In the 19th century, French realists and impressionists alike began to move away from painting still lives as Memento Mori/Vanitas artworks and began to paint scenes of everyday life –their objects and subjects –for their own sake. This shift was very unpopular; the painting was no longer edifying –just beautiful. Can you imagine a time when the impressionist “still life” was considered “modern” and ruffled the feathers of traditionalists? To best appreciate this genre, it’s important to understand that even the simplest subject matter faced criticism.

“(The) poor fabricators of still lifes, who have been so violently disbarred just when they least expected it . . . [T]hey are multiplying at an alarming rate. The rats in the Paris sewers are less numerous and less menacing. If the academic order ever crumbles, it will be because the still-life painters, down below, have gnawed away, one by one, at its foundations.”—Critic Jules Castagnary, writing about the Salon des refusés in 1863

Here are some quotations from the floral artists from the 1800s to help give some context to this genre (and perhaps redeem the critics’ harsh reviews with some romanticism). Enjoy this behind-the-scenes glimpse of still lifes and their hidden roots!

  • “I am following nature without being able to grasp her, I perhaps owe having become a painter to flowers.” – Claude Monet
  • “I must have flowers, always, and always.” – Claude Monet 
  • “A painter can say all he wants to with fruit or flowers or even clouds.” – Edouard Manet
  • “How right it is to love flowers and the greenery of pines and ivy and hawthorn hedges; they have been with us from the very beginning.” – Vincent Van Gough
  • “I am working at it every morning from sunrise on, for the flowers fade so soon, and the thing is to do the whole in one rush.” – Vincent Van Gough
  • “What seems to me to be one of the most important things about our movement is that we have freed painting from the tyranny of subject-matter. I am free to paint flowers and call them flowers, without having to weave a story round them.” – Pierre Auguste Renoir 
  • ” . . . I think that nothing is more difficult for a true painter than to paint a rose, since before he can do so, he has first to forget all the roses that were ever painted.” – Henri Matisse

How to Smell the Roses at our “In Bloom” exhibition

Posted on: June 26th, 2018 by admin No Comments

This week marked the start of our “In Bloom” exhibition here at Art Leaders. We look forward to celebrating floral art in all its forms –each painting as unique as the flowers they represent. But before we get too far into this exhibition, I wanted to offer some tips for appreciating the details during your visit in the gallery this month –a quick lesson in “slow looking”.

Despite the fact that the 70-plus paintings are of the same subject matter –the bouquet –they each offer so much beauty and interest when explored more carefully. Here are some ideas for how to prolong that quick glance into a slow look. You might be surprised at what beauty unfolds before you when you spend time with a single painting.

 

1. Scan the painting. I know, I know –I told you to slow down and now I’m telling you to “scan the painting”, but we can’t help of course but to take it in quickly at first, so do it. Scan the painting from left to right and top to bottom. Where does your eye fall within the painting? What grabs you as you eye wanders?

2. Get Close –so close that the painting becomes out of focus. From this perspective, try to figure how the artist created this piece of art one paint stroke at a time.

3. Step Back. How does the composition change when you step back a few feet? How do those details interact with each other to make the whole?

4. Consider Color. Spend some time with our flowers painted in the impressionist style. Chances are you’ll find multiple colors –perhaps the entire rainbow –within a single petal.

5. Seek out Details. Bugs like flowers too –can you find any hiding within these paintings? How about dew drops, perfectly poised to roll off smooth petals? Whether it be a tiny ant or an ironic swath of color –the beauty of each painting lies greatly in their details.

 

We hope to see you this weekend or throughout this month to enjoy our flower exhibition. Come in to practice your “slow looking” –after all, we can only appreciate life’s beauty when we take the time to stop and smell the roses.

33086 Northwestern Hwy

West Bloomfield, Michigan 48322

VIEW MAP

 

248-539-0262

Contact

Open Monday - Saturday

10 am to 6 pm EST

Additional Hours by Appointment Only

33086 Northwestern Hwy
West Bloomfield, Michigan 48322
VIEW MAP

248-539-0262
Contact

Open Monday - Saturday
10 am to 6 pm EST
Additional Hours by Appointment Only